Word of the Day- March 9, 2019

penumbra

(pĭ-nŭm′brə)

n. pl. pe·num·bras or pe·num·brae (-brē)

1. A partial shadow, as in an eclipse, between regions of complete shadow and complete illumination.
2. The diffuse outer part of a sunspot.
3. An area in which something exists to a lesser or uncertain degree: “The First Amendment has a penumbra where privacy is protected from governmental intrusion” (Joseph A. Califano, Jr.).
4. An outlying surrounding region; a periphery: “Downtown Chicago and its penumbra also stand rejuvenated”

Word of the Day, March 2, 2019

belay

(bĭ-lā′)

v. be·layed, be·lay·ing, be·lays
v.tr.

1. Nautical To secure or make fast (a rope, for example) by winding on a cleat or pin.
2. To provide security to (a climber) by paying out or drawing in rope, often through a braking device, in readiness to break a potential fall.
3. To cause to stop.
v.intr.

1. To be made secure.
2. Used in the imperative as an order to stop: Belay there!
n.

1. The act of belaying a climber.
2. A system of ropes and anchors by which a climber is belayed.

Word of the Day – February 16, 2019

occultation

(ŏk′ŭl-tā′shən)

n.

1. The act of occulting or the state of being occulted.
2. Astronomy

a. The passage of a celestial object across the line of sight between an observer and another celestial object, as when the moon moves between Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.
b. The progressive blocking and unblocking of light or other electromagnetic radiation from a celestial source during such a passage: a lunar occultation of a quasar; a planetary occultation of a star.
c. An observational technique for determining the position or radiant structure of a celestial source undergoing such occultation or of the object causing the occultation.

Word of the day – February 9, 2019

Hackles

1. Any of the long, slender, often glossy feathers on the neck of a bird, especially a male fowl.
2. hackles The erectile hairs along the back of the neck of an animal, especially of a dog.
3. A feather, usually from the neck of a chicken, used in trimming a fishing fly.
tr.v. hack·led, hack·ling, hack·les

To trim (an artificial fishing fly) with a hackle.

Idiom:

get (one’s) hackles up

To be extremely insulted or irritated.

Life

I started this blog in 2012. At that time, we were both miserable. The past three years had torn our lives apart. Little did we know, life was about to hit us in the face.

After Barry’s stroke, we had a small repreive.In that time, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Chemo and radiation began.During this time, we were able to catch up with life.

The months of August were quiet until Barry passed out in the living room. He spent a few days at the local hospital and was transferred to north Atlanta. That glorious trip lead to 5 months in the hospital.

I almost lost my husband a second time. I am exploring the bible and learning more about being a Christain. Barry knows he is saved. He is happy with his Christainity, so I quit worrying about his salvation.I know we will see each other again some day. 

I do not remember any of this, I ended up running around our apartment complex at 3am, confused without a clue. To this date, I still do not remember a thing.  I cringe when I think of the police being called on me. The hospital had to figure out who I was and locate my sweet hubby! Blood clots and all.

We took a trip to the Cleveland Clinic. I do not understand why we went, but we had hope that we may get some answers. NOT……..

I experienced another episode the first of last year. I ended up with a medication combo that did not go well. Woke me up.

While discussing my health, decided to do things to lessen my chances of tumors forming. I had a double mastectomy in October. Here we sit in January 2019. The Seroma! I developed has healed. Barry is happy and healthy.

All healed up and home together, I sit here reminiscing about the past 10 years. We are still here! We are alive and love the Good Lord above!

Word of the Day January 19, 2019

intransigent

also intransigeant  (ĭn-trăn′sə-jənt, -zə-)

adj.

Refusing to moderate a position, especially an extreme position; uncompromising.

[French intransigeant, from Spanish intransigente : in-, not (from Latin; see in-1) + transigente, present participle of transigir, to compromise (from Latin trānsigere, to come to an agreement : trāns-, trans- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

in·tran′si·gence, in·tran′si·gen·cy n.
in·tran′si·gent n.
in·tran′si·gent·ly adv.

Word of the Day, January 12, 2019

bucolic

(bjuːˈkɒlɪk)

adj

1. of or characteristic of the countryside or country life; rustic
2. of or relating to shepherds; pastoral
n

3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (sometimes plural) a pastoral poem, often in the form of a dialogue
4. a rustic; farmer or shepherd
[C16: from Latin būcolicus, from Greek boukolikos, from boukolos cowherd, from bous ox]
buˈcolically adv