Word of the Day, March 16, 2019

dep·re·cate

(dĕp′rĭ-kāt′)

tr.v. de·pre·cat·ed, de·pre·cat·ing, de·pre·cates

1. To express disapproval of; deplore.
2. To belittle; depreciate.
3. Computers To mark (a component of a software standard) as obsolete to warn against its use in the future so that it may be phased out.
Cite: freedictionary.com

Word of the Day- March 9, 2019

penumbra

(pĭ-nŭm′brə)

n. pl. pe·num·bras or pe·num·brae (-brē)

1. A partial shadow, as in an eclipse, between regions of complete shadow and complete illumination.
2. The diffuse outer part of a sunspot.
3. An area in which something exists to a lesser or uncertain degree: “The First Amendment has a penumbra where privacy is protected from governmental intrusion” (Joseph A. Califano, Jr.).
4. An outlying surrounding region; a periphery: “Downtown Chicago and its penumbra also stand rejuvenated”

Word of the day – February 9, 2019

Hackles

1. Any of the long, slender, often glossy feathers on the neck of a bird, especially a male fowl.
2. hackles The erectile hairs along the back of the neck of an animal, especially of a dog.
3. A feather, usually from the neck of a chicken, used in trimming a fishing fly.
tr.v. hack·led, hack·ling, hack·les

To trim (an artificial fishing fly) with a hackle.

Idiom:

get (one’s) hackles up

To be extremely insulted or irritated.

Word of the Day January 19, 2019

intransigent

also intransigeant  (ĭn-trăn′sə-jənt, -zə-)

adj.

Refusing to moderate a position, especially an extreme position; uncompromising.

[French intransigeant, from Spanish intransigente : in-, not (from Latin; see in-1) + transigente, present participle of transigir, to compromise (from Latin trānsigere, to come to an agreement : trāns-, trans- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

in·tran′si·gence, in·tran′si·gen·cy n.
in·tran′si·gent n.
in·tran′si·gent·ly adv.

Word of the Day December 8, 2018

turgid

(tûr′jĭd)

adj.

1. Excessively ornate or complex in style or language; grandiloquent: turgid prose.
2. Swollen or distended, as from a fluid; bloated: a turgid bladder; turgid veins.

[Latin turgidus, from turgēre, to be swollen.]

tur·gid′i·ty, tur′gid·ness n.
tur′gid·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Cite: http://www.freedictionary.com

Word of the Day- December 1, 2018

elucidate

 (ĭ-lo͞o′sĭ-dāt′)

v. e·lu·ci·dat·ed, e·lu·ci·dat·ing, e·lu·ci·dates
v.tr.

To make clear or plain, especially by explanation; clarify. See Synonyms at explain.
v.intr.

To explain or clarify something: She gave a one-word answer and refused to elucidate any further.

[Late Latin ēlūcidāre, ēlūcidāt- : Latin ē-, ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + Latin lūcidus, bright (from lūcēre, to shine; see leuk- in Indo-European roots).]

e·lu′ci·da′tion n.
e·lu′ci·da′tive adj.
e·lu′ci·da′tor n.

Thanksgiving with Mom

Everyone arrived when was expected. Almost on time, for a change. We asked if we could be of any assistance, did anything that was asked of us and then settled in to play with the kids.

Mom arrived for our family celeration. She went to the kitchen to drop food off and ask our hostess where to put everything she brought. She had deviled eggs and a dish of…… !?! Sorry I cannot remember. Mom needed a dish for the deviled eggs.

Our hostess handed her the egg dish. She looked on the counter for the filling. Our hostess, mom and I started to giggle. Mom forgot the filling for the eggs! We had 24 egg halves and no yokes.

Mom

Thanksgiving

Word of the Day November 17, 2018

propitiation

noun

pro·​pi·​ti·​a·​tion | \prō-ˌpi-shē-ˈā-shən \

Definition of propitiation 

1 : the act of propitiating

2 : something that propitiates specifically : an atoning sacrifice

Examples of propitiation in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

The scapegoat, as defined in the Book of Leviticus, is a propitiation. Sarah Jones, New Republic, “The Mental Health Scapegoat,” 16 Feb. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘propitiation.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors.