Word of the Day – April 6, 2019

moiety

noun

moi·​e·​ty | \ ˈmȯi-ə-tē \
plural moieties

Definition of moiety

1a : one of two equal parts : half
b : one of two approximately equal parts … war, pestilence, and famine had consumed … the moiety of the human species.— Edward Gibbon
2 : one of the portions into which something is divided : component, part an ether molecule with a benzene moiety
3 : one of two basic complementary tribal subdivisions the pueblo’s population is divided into two halves or moieties; the Squash, or Winter People, and the Turquoise, or Summer People  CITE: http://www.freedictionary.com

Word of the Day, March 30, 2019

roundabout

(round′ə-bout′)

adj.

1. Indirect; circuitous: took a roundabout route because the bridge was closed.
2. Characterized by indirectness, evasiveness, or vagueness: a roundabout claim that avoided the issues being discussed.
n.

1. A short, close-fitting jacket.
2. Chiefly British

a. A merry-go-round.
b. A traffic circle.

Word of the day – February 9, 2019

Hackles

1. Any of the long, slender, often glossy feathers on the neck of a bird, especially a male fowl.
2. hackles The erectile hairs along the back of the neck of an animal, especially of a dog.
3. A feather, usually from the neck of a chicken, used in trimming a fishing fly.
tr.v. hack·led, hack·ling, hack·les

To trim (an artificial fishing fly) with a hackle.

Idiom:

get (one’s) hackles up

To be extremely insulted or irritated.

Word of the Day October 6, 2018

burgeon

also bour·geon (bûr′jən)

intr.v. bur·geoned, bur·geon·ing, bur·geons also bour·geoned or bour·geon·ing or bour·geons

1.

a. To put forth new buds, leaves, or greenery; sprout.
b. To begin to grow or blossom.
2. To grow or develop rapidly; expand or proliferate.

Word of the Day February 10, 2018

dot·age

(dō′tĭj)

n.

A deterioration of mental faculties associated with aging

n
1. feebleness of mind, esp as a result of old age
2. foolish infatuation

Word of the Day October 7, 2017

e·phem·er·al

(ĭ-fĕm′ər-əl)

adj.

1. Lasting for a markedly brief time: “There remain some truths too ephemeral to be captured in the cold pages of a court transcript” (Irving R. Kaufman).
2. Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants.
n.

Something, especially a plant, that is ephemeral.

[From Greek ephēmeros : ep-, epi-, epi- + hēmerā, day.]

e·phem′er·al′i·ty, e·phem′er·al·ness n.
e·phem′er·al·ly adv.