Word of the Day September 9, 2017

Pragmatic

(prăg-măt′ĭk)

adj.

1. Dealing or concerned with facts or actual occurrences; practical.
2. Philosophy Of or relating to pragmatism.
3. Linguistics Of or relating to pragmatics.
4. Relating to or being the study of cause and effect in historical or political events with emphasis on the practical lessons to be learned from them.
n.

A pragmatic sanction.

[Latin prāgmaticus, skilled in business, from Greek prāgmatikos, from prāgma, prāgmat-, deed, from prāssein, prāg-, to do.]

prag·mat′i·cal adj.
prag·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

Word of the Day September 2,2017

Perponderance

pre·pon·der·ance

(prĭ-pŏn′dər-əns) also pre·pon·der·an·cy (-ən-sē)

n.

Superiority in weight, force, importance, or influence.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

preponderance

(prɪˈpɒndərəns) or

preponderancy

n

the quality of being greater in weight, force, influence, etc: the preponderance of right-handed people.

Word of the Day August 26, 2017

du•plic•i•tous

(duˈplɪs ɪ təs, dyu-)

adj.

marked or characterized by duplicity.
[1960–65]
du•plic′i•tous•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Word of the day August 19, 2017

A Gore

A gore (British English: nose),[1] refers to a triangular piece of land. Etymologically it is derived from gār, meaning spear.[2] Gores on highways are categorized as two types: the theoretical gore and the physical gore. The physical gore is the unpaved area created between the highway mainline and a ramp that merges into or diverges from the mainline. The theoretical gore is the marked area of pavement resulting from the convergence or divergence of the edge lines of the mainline and ramp. theoretical gores are commonly marked with transverse lines or chevrons at both entrance and exit ramps. These help drivers entering the highway to estimate how much time they have to match the speed of through traffic, and warn drivers improperly exiting the highway right down the middle of a gore that they are about to run out of road. Gores at exit ramps occasionally feature impact attenuators, especially when there is something solid at the other end of the gore.

Cite: http://www.wikipedia.com

 

A Day of many Emotions

Monday August 14, 2017, A Day full of Varied Emotions.

My Wife had her yearly Mammogram. All was clear, come back in one year, yeah!  This was also the Day my Father-in-law, Lee Van Hayes passed away in 2013. Four years ago this day I was rushed into Emergency Open Heart Surgery. The news of my Jill’s Dad passing, I was clueless to reality due trouble coming off the Ventilator. I felt awful being heavily sedated, while my Jill had to deal with his passing without me. I was on the ventilator for 6 weeks. I still felt sad; I was not there for her, when she was there for me, while still having to take Chemo and Radiation. My wife holds no grudge and never would, and I have forgiven myself.

This is the essence of the Marriage Vows; In Sickness and in Health, to never abandon one another regardless of the challenges. We reach down tighten our boot straps and move onward one step at a time, with God lighting our Pathway. – Barry Baynes, writer –

Word of the Day August 12, 2017

Idiopathic

Idiopathic is a medical term which is used to describe a condition which has no known cause. When a patient’s case is described as idiopathic, it means that the doctor does not know what caused the condition. This can be problematic, since sometimes identifying the cause of a condition is part of the process of finding an appropriate treatment. Idiopathic conditions can also be very frustrating for medical personnel, as lack of understanding about a cause makes it hard to prevent recurrence of the condition or future cases in other patients.

The term comes from the Greek words idios, or “one’s own,” and pathos, or suffering

CITE: http://www.medicaldictionary.com

Word of the Day August 6, 2017

per·pe·tu·i·ty

(pûr′pĭ-to͞o′ĭ-tē, -tyo͞o′-)

n. pl. per·pe·tu·i·ties

1. The quality or condition of being perpetual: “The perpetuity of the Church was an article of faith” (Morris L. West).
2. Time without end; eternity.
3. Law

a. The condition of an estate that is limited so as to be inalienable either perpetually or longer than the period determined by law.
b. An estate so limited.
4. An annuity payable indefinitely.

Idiom:

in perpetuity

For an indefinite period of time; forever.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.