Word of the Day December 16, 2017

verbosity

adj.

Using or containing a great and usually an excessive number of words; wordy. See Synonyms at wordy.

[Middle English *verbous, from Latin verbōsus, from verbum, word; see verb.]

ver·bose′ly adv.
ver·bose′ness, ver·bos′i·ty (-bŏs′ĭ-tē) n

Word of the Day October 7, 2017

e·phem·er·al

(ĭ-fĕm′ər-əl)

adj.

1. Lasting for a markedly brief time: “There remain some truths too ephemeral to be captured in the cold pages of a court transcript” (Irving R. Kaufman).
2. Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants.
n.

Something, especially a plant, that is ephemeral.

[From Greek ephēmeros : ep-, epi-, epi- + hēmerā, day.]

e·phem′er·al′i·ty, e·phem′er·al·ness n.
e·phem′er·al·ly adv.

Word of the day August 19, 2017

A Gore

A gore (British English: nose),[1] refers to a triangular piece of land. Etymologically it is derived from gār, meaning spear.[2] Gores on highways are categorized as two types: the theoretical gore and the physical gore. The physical gore is the unpaved area created between the highway mainline and a ramp that merges into or diverges from the mainline. The theoretical gore is the marked area of pavement resulting from the convergence or divergence of the edge lines of the mainline and ramp. theoretical gores are commonly marked with transverse lines or chevrons at both entrance and exit ramps. These help drivers entering the highway to estimate how much time they have to match the speed of through traffic, and warn drivers improperly exiting the highway right down the middle of a gore that they are about to run out of road. Gores at exit ramps occasionally feature impact attenuators, especially when there is something solid at the other end of the gore.

Cite: http://www.wikipedia.com

 

Word of the Day August 12, 2017

Idiopathic

Idiopathic is a medical term which is used to describe a condition which has no known cause. When a patient’s case is described as idiopathic, it means that the doctor does not know what caused the condition. This can be problematic, since sometimes identifying the cause of a condition is part of the process of finding an appropriate treatment. Idiopathic conditions can also be very frustrating for medical personnel, as lack of understanding about a cause makes it hard to prevent recurrence of the condition or future cases in other patients.

The term comes from the Greek words idios, or “one’s own,” and pathos, or suffering

CITE: http://www.medicaldictionary.com

“Word of the week” Ubiquious

We could not let this one go……………………………………

adjective ubiq·ui·tous \yü-ˈbi-kwətous

                                                                    Simple Definition of ubiquitous

                                                                    : seeming to be seen everywhere

Source: Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s Dictionary

Full Definition of ubiquitous

  1. :  existing or being everywhere at the same time:  constantly encountered:widespread<aubiquitous fashion>

ubiquitously

adverb

ubiquitousness
noun

by Jill B.

Word of the Weekend: resplendent

resplendent\rih-SPLEN-dunt\

adjective: shining brilliantly : characterized by a glowing splendor
 
All eyes were drawn to the beautiful young woman—resplendent in an elegant evening gown—who had just appeared at the top of the stairway.
 
“On a dazzling Saturday afternoon, splashed with resplendent sunshine after too many cool gray days of rain, I slowly picked my way through the hordes of tourists….” — From an article by Kaelen Wilson-Goldie in Artforum, June 8, 2013

Did you know?

“Resplendent” has a lot in common with “splendid” (meaning “shining” or “brilliant”), “splendent” (“shining” or “glossy”), and “splendor” (“brightness” or “luster”). Each of those glowing terms gets its shine from the Latin verb “splendēre” (“to shine”). Etymologists believe “splendēre” might also be related to Middle Irish “lainn,” meaning “bright.” “Splendent,” “splendor,” and “resplendent” first showed their lustrous senses in English during the 15th century, but “splendid” didn’t light up our language until over 175 years later; its earliest known use dates from 1624.

Compliments of:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/

Word of the Weekend for July 14, 2013: Fungible

Word of the Day
 
 
fungible\FUN-juh-bul\
 
adjective
 
1 :
being of such a nature that one part or quantity may be replaced by another equal part or quantity in the satisfaction of an obligation
 
2 :
interchangeable
 
3 :
flexible
 

 

Examples:
 
Since fruits and vegetables are regarded as fungible in this diet, you are allowed a total of five servings of either or both.
 
“Oil is a fungible commodity and its prices are determined in the global market.” — From an article by Gal Luft in The Wichita Eagle (Kansas), May 30, 2013
 
“Fungible”—which derives from the Latin verb “fungi,” meaning “to perform” (no relation to the noun “fungus” and its plural “fungi”)—is a word that often shows up in legal and political contexts. Something fungible can be exchanged for something else of the same kind. For example, when we say “oil is a fungible commodity,” we mean that when a purchaser is expecting a delivery of oil, any oil of the stipulated quantity and quality will usually do. Another example of something fungible is cash. It doesn’t matter what twenty dollar bill you get — it’s still worth the same amount as any other twenty dollar bill. In contrast, something like a painting isn’t fungible; a purchaser would expect a specific, identifiable item to be delivered. In broader use, “fungible” can mean “interchangeable” or sometimes “changeable, fluid, or malleable.”

Compliments of Merriam-Webster, Incorporated
http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/
 
 

Word of the Weekend: Perfervid

perfervid\per-FER-vid\
adjective
:marked by overwrought or exaggerated emotion
:excessively fervent

The group’s leaders have done little to distance themselves from the actions of their angrier and more perfervid followers.

“Biron has struggled to make the Dostoevsky apartment a center for the perpetual and perfervid enthusiasm for the author that animates Russians.” — From an article by Philip Kennicott inThe Washington Post, October 21, 2012

The adjectives “fervent,” “fervid,” and “perfervid” all derive from the Latin verb “fervēre,” meaning “to boil,” and suggest a bubbling up of intense feeling. “Fervent” was the first to enter the English language in the 14th century. It stresses sincerity and steadiness of emotional warmth and zeal, as in “Her colleagues expressed fervent good wishes.” The next to emerge was “fervid” in the late 16th century. It too suggests warmth but adds an element of spontaneity and feverishness. A lover might write a fervid billet-doux to his beloved, for example. With its first known appearance in print dating back only to 1833, “perfervid” is a relative newcomer to English, but it implies the most extreme or exaggerated expression of emotion. Its intensity comes from “per-,” a prefix meaning “thoroughly.”

Words provided by Merriam-Webster.com

Word of the weekend: Peccant

Peccant, ( \PEK-unt\ ), adjective

1 :guilty of a moral offense : sinning 
2 :violating a principle or rule : faulty  

Examples: Outside the confessional stood a short line of peccant parishioners waiting to seek redemption for their sins. 

“His own translation of Heinrich Heine’s ‘A Woman’ features a naughtily misbehaving protagonist and herpeccant boyfriend….” — From a review by Benjamin Ivry in The Forward, April 27, 2012  

Sponsored Link    “Peccant” comes from the Latin verb “peccare,” which means “to sin,” “to commit a fault,” or “to stumble,” and is related to the better-known English word “peccadillo” (“a slight offense”). Etymologists have suggested that “peccare” might be related to Latin “ped-” or “pes,” meaning “foot,” by way of an unattested adjective, “peccus,” which may have been used to mean “having an injured foot” or “stumbling. “Whether or not a connection truly exists between “peccant” and “peccus,” “peccant” itself involves stumbling of a figurative kind—making errors, for example, or falling stumbling.” Whether or not a connection truly exists between “peccant” and “peccus,” “peccant” itself involves stumbling of a figurative kind—making errors, for example, or falling into immoral, corrupt, or sinful behavior.

Word of the Weekend: Hoise

hoise: 
verb 
: lift, raise; especially 
: to raise into position by or as if by means of tackle   

Bethany was selected by her Girl Scout troop to hoise the American flag for Monday’s Memorial Day ceremony on the town green. “In order for [New England Patriot’s quarterback Tom] Brady to play a great game, which is a must if the Pats want to hoise the Lombardi Trophy, he needs to stay upright.” — From an article by Nick Curcuru and Michael Muldoon in the Gloucester Daily Times(Massachusetts), January 27, 2013  Sponsored Link    

The connection between “hoise” and “hoist” is a bit confusing. The two words are essentially synonymous variants, but “hoist” is far more common. You’ll rarely encounter “hoise” in any of its regular forms: “hoise,” “hoised,” or “hoising.” But a variant of its past participle shows up fairly frequently as part of a set expression.

And now, here’s the confusing part—that variant past participle is “hoist”! The expression is “hoist with (or by) one’s own petard,” which means “victimized or hurt by one’s own scheme.” This oft-heard phrase owes its popularity to Shakespeare’s Hamlet: “For ’tis the sport to have the engineer hoist with his own petar[d].” (A petard is a medieval explosive. The quote implies that the engineer—the person who sets the explosive device—is blown into the air by the explosion of his own device.) 

Jill and Barry Baynes